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Minutes from an Eggcelent Meeting (04/15/2015)

April 17, 2015

Greeters: Tom Putnam, Lucille Ramirez

Invocation: Richard Redmond

Flag Pledge: Bill Ringer

Raffle: Joanne Schoenfeld Orenstein

Sgt. At Arms: Luz Maria Ortiz Smith brought a bottle of wine as well as a cheese and knife set.

Visiting Rotarians: Jackson Moss – PE, Rotary Club of Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas, District 5840, just outside of San Antonio, 45 members, Youth Exchange Students: Julia Pinho (Brazil); Scooter Pinkerton (Italy); Magda Guzewicz (Poland)

Guests of Rotarians: Bobbie Ruh

 Announcements:

  • Eight people are leaving today to help with an eye surgery clinic with SEE International in Celaya, Mexico. Thank you to Bill Abel, Janet Napier, Connard Hogan, Colin Stephens, Angela Stephens, Dennis Johns, Virginia Johns, and Robert Cullom for representing the club.
  • SKR reminded the club that the Dental Clinic will be at the Eastside Dental Clinic on Friday, May 1. Talk with Susan to sign up. There are open spots 8:30-4:30. Thanks to Eric Ryan, Sandra O’Meara, and Bruce Belfiore, who have already signed up.
  • The Weird Golf Committee will meet Wednesday, April 15 at 6 PM at Wildcat. Joe Weiland will lead.
  • We want 100% of club members to make some donation to The Rotary Foundation and the Rotary Club of Santa Barbara Sunrise Foundation. We now have 86% participation.  The money from the Foundation goes to International and Community Service projects.
  • David Velarde announced the District Membership Action Rally will be Saturday, April 18 from 9 AM to noon at the Santa Barbara Braille Institute. It’s free, and light refreshments will be provided. Registration is limited to 100 people. Once it’s full, there will be a webinar option for people to watch. People on the webinar will be able to participate and ask questions. The Zone Membership Team will be conducting a special membership training referred to as “New Focus.” Presenters include PDG Shirley Grace and PDG Larry Sundram. At this seminar we will hear about the research conducted on behalf of Rotary International and how RI has responded to the findings. This seminar is designed to promote recruitment and retention of club members with training that will help each attendee better understand why people join Rotary and what keeps them in Rotary. Register at http://www.rotarydistrict5240.org/Event/498c85f2-7d73-4b29-a83b-17a339a9f0a1
  • Upcoming  programs:

April 22 — Scott Burns “Organ Donation Program”

April 29 — Dr. Winifred Leung “History of Imaging: From Early X-RAYS to Tomosynthesis”

May 6 — Beverly Schwartzberg & Guen Wagy “Santa Barbara Public Library Children’s Library Project”

May 13 — Chris Baxter, Tom Heath & Janet Napier “Santa Barbara Sunrise Rotary International Service”

May 20 — Dana Goba “Club Assembly on Membership”

May 27 — American Red Cross “Home Fire Preparedness Campaign”

June 3 —  Sandy Grasso-Boyd “South Africa Adventure”

June 10 — Chris Tucker “My National Immunization Day Experience in India”

June 17 — SB Sunrise Board “Avenues of Service Recognition”

June 24 — One Weird President “Dana Goba’s Stepdown”

  • Next week’s duties are: Greeters: Eric Ryan, Diana Washburn; Invocation: E. Russell Smith; Flag Pledge: TBD; Raffle: TBD; Sgt. At Arms: Jim Ruh
  • Scott Burns is doing a fundraiser on April 26 to raise money for his church friend. They are forming groups to run 26 miles on the San Marcos track.
  • The club watched Weird Al’s Craigslist 
  • Pay and Tell with Sergeant at Arms Luz Maria

Program:  Dana Goba introced Scott Ramsdell to speak about the “American Egg Board.”

  • Scott Ransdell is a 5th generation farmer, and is President and CEO of Dakota Layers.
  • Along with the rest of America’s egg farmers, Scott is committed to caring for his animals and providing nutritious, affordable eggs.
  • Scott earned a B.S. from South Dakota University and has served actively in egg organizations to ensure access to the latest research and information available about egg production.
  • Scott is here today as part of the Good Egg Project, a two-pronged effort by America’s egg farmers, to educate you about how eggs travel from egg farms to your plate and to fight childhood hunger.
  • He took over his father’s operation that was started over 60 years ago. His ancestors started farming in South Dakota and he still considers it home. His second home is in San Luis Obispo. His CA operation is called Rosemary Farms and was started in Santa Maria.
  • His operation in South Dakota is considered a factory farm. He doesn’t consider it a bad thing. He needs to keep the chicken in a controlled environment to help with things like salmonella or protect from wild predators like coyotes.
  • Birds went from 48” to 116” space which is being required in California. He’s only been in the industry for 12 years. He is open to the idea that birds should have open areas but it’s also very impractical to produce enough eggs. After 90 weeks, birds are sent to the soup factory. Farmers trick the birds into thinking it’s Spring for 90 weeks so it will keep producing eggs. They expect 8.5 eggs every 10 days.
  • In every building, the chickens have to be the same age. Each barn has 135,000 to 194,000 chickens.
  • Rosemary Farms use different farmers around the Central Coast. These birds are truly free roaming. They have to come back to the coup at night to sleep. These are called pasture raised. It costs 4 times as much to grow an egg in this manner versus the South Dakota operation. An egg from SD is never touched. Within 24 hours it’s packaged and within 3 days it’s in California. An egg in California can sit in storage for 29 days then an additional period up to 60 days before it’s packaged and sold as fresh. People don’t like the Dakota Layers eggs because they won’t peel (eggs need to be old to be peeled).
  • Only in the United States do we think we are smarter than the chicken. Eggs can be stored on the counter for weeks because there is a natural sealant that’s on the egg. In the U.S., we wash off the sealant and then it immediately needs to be refrigerated.
  • In SD, they sell the chicken litter to farmers as commercial fertilizer.
  • In honor of the speaker, the club will donate 15 dictionaries to local 3rd graders.
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